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Stateful packet filtering, Network Address Translation (NAT), port forwarding, passive operating system fingerprinting, packet queueing and Quality of Service, load balancing, and redundant firewalls are available with OpenBSD's PF system. PF is known to be a proven, high-performance, and innovative packet filtering system. FreeBSD: the community is more open to ideas and questions to which anybody will probably always get a response. If you have a general question, you can send an email to the addresses listed at www.freebsd.org website. OpenBSD: the community (www.openbsd.org) is closed, uncommunicative; some people say that it does not like questions.

Dec 11, 2016 · I'll answer mainly on Solaris and Linux as I know both intimately. Unfortunately I only have limited experience with FreeBSD or OpenBSD. You'll get an opinionated answer from me.
They found that even now, FreeBSD or OpenBSD are their choice either because of stability or speed. I found that interesting given some of the claims I've seem on this list, and others, that Linux is now as stable and high performance as FreeBSD on Intel. The NASA boys don't think so. FreeBSD: 1.
The three most notable descendants in current use are FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and NetBSD, which are all derived from 386BSD and 4.4BSD-Lite, by various routes. Both NetBSD and FreeBSD started life in 1993, initially derived from 386BSD, but in 1994 migrating to a 4.4BSD-Lite code base. OpenBSD was forked in 1995 from NetBSD.
OpenBSD 4.8 vs FreeBSD 8.1 em0 Network Performance As mentioned in one of my earlier postings, I have been looking into OpenBSD as a possible firewall OS. I'll post a more opinion-based article shortly on what I think about OpenBSD vs FreeBSD, but for now, I thought I'd report this tidbit of info;
The three most notable descendants in current use are FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and NetBSD, which are all derived from 386BSD and 4.4BSD-Lite, by various routes. Both NetBSD and FreeBSD started life in 1993, initially derived from 386BSD, but in 1994 migrating to a 4.4BSD-Lite code base. OpenBSD was forked in 1995 from NetBSD.
The three most notable descendants in current use are FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and NetBSD, which are all derived from 386BSD and 4.4BSD-Lite, by various routes. Both NetBSD and FreeBSD started life in 1993, initially derived from 386BSD, but in 1994 migrating to a 4.4BSD-Lite code base. OpenBSD was forked in 1995 from NetBSD.
Network Speed and Performance Guide (OpenBSD) Home Many of today's desktop systems and servers come with on board gigabit network controllers. After some simple speeds tests you will soon find out that you are not be able to transfer data over the network much faster than you did with a 100MB link.
The Wikipedia page describes the feelings for FreeBSD 4 thusly: "…widely regarded as one of the most stable and high performance operating systems of the whole Unix lineage." FreeBSD in particular has added other features over time which would appeal to hosting providers, such as jail and ZFS support.
May 25, 2020 · FreeBSD is my favorite, for ease of install and overall performance, but you have to build the desktop yourself. The install is just the base OS, nothing more. Not saying FreeBSD cannot be a desktop; I have ran it as such for a couple of years but it has idiosyncrasies.
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  • Um, read the benchmarks. Yes, FreeBSD had the lowest latency for reading the first byte of the file. However, it had abysmal performance for doing the actual mmap(). That’s why Linux was declared the winner — both had constant time performance for the first-byte test, but FreeBSD had O(n) performance for the mmap() test while Linux remained ...
  • focus. In general FreeBSD is more about 'cutting edge performance', OpenBSD is bugfixing/security, and NetBSD portability. Often the reasons for picking one over another are pretty arbitrary and don't really qualify as 'reasons'.
  • FreeBSD vs OpenBSD: What are the differences? FreeBSD: An operating system used to power modern servers, desktops, and embedded platforms. An operating system for a variety of platforms which focuses on features, speed, and stability. It is derived from BSD, the version of UNIX® developed at the University of California, Berkeley.
  • PF will only use one processor, so multiple processors (or multiple cores) WILL NOT improve PF performance. However, under some circumstances, running the SMP version of OpenBSD (bsd.mp) instead of bsd will give better performance due to differences in how interrupt handling is done. If you are seeing performance problems, experiment with this.
  • PF will only use one processor, so multiple processors (or multiple cores) WILL NOT improve PF performance. However, under some circumstances, running the SMP version of OpenBSD (bsd.mp) instead of bsd will give better performance due to differences in how interrupt handling is done. If you are seeing performance problems, experiment with this.

As of 27 March 2020, using a data span of the last six months it placed FreeBSD in 21st place with 452 hits per day, GhostBSD in 51st place with 243 hits, TrueOS in 54th place with 182 hits per day, DragonflyBSD in 75th place with 180 hits, OpenBSD in 80th place with 169 hits per day and NetBSD in 109th place with 105 hits per day.

Stateful packet filtering, Network Address Translation (NAT), port forwarding, passive operating system fingerprinting, packet queueing and Quality of Service, load balancing, and redundant firewalls are available with OpenBSD's PF system. PF is known to be a proven, high-performance, and innovative packet filtering system.
Realistically speaking, for the limited use case of a medium-end desktop or a low-end home server, SMT doesn't affect performance in a significantly noticeable manner, and it can be re-enabled at any time on OpenBSD either way. For the record, I have smtoff=YES in /etc/rc.conf on my NetBSD servers. Mar 31, 2013 · And there you have it Linux is not just far better then BSD in general but has even beaten each of the three major BSDs in their own game. FreeBSD aims for performance but Linux has far better performance and speed then it. OpenBSD aims for security but Linux is far more security then it.

PF will only use one processor, so multiple processors (or multiple cores) WILL NOT improve PF performance. However, under some circumstances, running the SMP version of OpenBSD (bsd.mp) instead of bsd will give better performance due to differences in how interrupt handling is done. If you are seeing performance problems, experiment with this.

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OpenBSD is more secure. FreeBSD is higher performance and more functionality. Neither is “better” they’re both tools for different jobs IMHO. Which one is “better” for a particular box depends on what tasks you expect that box to do, and what trade-offs you are willing to make.